Skip Nav

What is an Academic Paper?

Writing Courses

❶The most common approach to writing an analytical essay is to use a compare and contrast format.

Types of Academic Essays

website to writing models for different types of academic papers
Most Popular
Admissions + Aid

The descriptive essay strives to communicate a deeper meaning through the description. In a descriptive essay, the writer should show, not tell, through the use of colorful words and sensory details. Just the Facts The expository essay is an informative piece of writing that presents a balanced analysis of a topic. In an expository essay, the writer explains or defines a topic, using facts, statistics, and examples. The writer must build a case using facts and logic, as well as examples, expert opinion, and sound reasoning.

The writer should present all sides of the argument, but must be able to communicate clearly and without equivocation why a certain position is correct. Time4Writing essay writing courses offer a highly effective way to learn how to write the types of essays required for school, standardized tests, and college applications. These online writing classes for elementary, middle school, and high school students, break down the writing process into manageable chunks, easily digested by young writers.

Students steadily build writing skills and confidence with each online writing course, guided by one-on-one instruction with a dedicated, certified teacher. In the elementary years, young writers get an introduction to essay writing through two courses designed to bring excitement and enjoyment to the writing process. Narrative Writing and Informative Writing take young writers on an animal-filled adventure to beginning essay writing. Our middle school online writing courses, Welcome to the Essay and Advanced Essay , teach students the fundamentals of writing well-constructed essays.

The high school online writing class, Exciting Essay Writing , focuses in depth on the essay writing process with preparation for college as the goal. The online writing classes for kids also cover how to interpret essay writing prompts in testing situations.

With the help of my incredible teacher, I have brought my writing to a new level. Use Time4Learning As A: When you write an academic paper, you must first try to find a topic or a question that is relevant and appropriate - not only to you, but to the academic community of which you are now a part. But how do you know when a topic is relevant and appropriate to this community?

First of all, pay attention to what your professor is saying. She will certainly be giving you a context into which you can place your questions and observations. Second, understand that your paper should be of interest to other students and scholars.

Remember that academic writing must be more than personal response. You must write something that your readers will find useful. In other words, you will want to write something that helps your reader to better understand your topic, or to see it in a new way. This brings us to our final point: Academic writing should present the reader with an informed argument.

To construct an informed argument, you must first try to sort out what you know about a subject from what you think about a subject. Or, to put it another way, you will want to consider what is known about a subject and then to determine what you think about it. If your paper fails to inform, or if it fails to argue, then it will fail to meet the expectations of the academic reader. Different writing assignments require different degrees of knowing.

It may not even require you to have mastered the terms important to film criticism - though clearly any knowledge you bring to the film might help you to make a thoughtful response to it. However, if you are asked to write an academic paper on the film, then you will want to know more. You will want to have certain terms in hand so that you can explain what Hitchcock is doing in key moments.

In the process of really thinking about your topic, your aim is to come up with a fresh observation. You must also add something of your own to the conversation.

Understand, however, that "adding something of your own" is not an invitation simply to bring your own personal associations, reactions, or experiences to the reading of a text. To create an informed argument, you must first recognize that your writing should be analytical rather than personal. In other words, your writing must show that your associations, reactions, and experiences of a text have been framed in a critical, rather than a personal, way. First, summarize what the primary text is saying.

You can also summarize what you know about the film in context. You can also summarize what others have said about the film. Film critics have written much about Hitchcock, his films, and their genre. Try to summarize all that you know.

The process of evaluation is an ongoing one. Evaluating a text is different from simply reacting to a text.

When you evaluate for an academic purpose, it is important to be able to clearly articulate and to support your own personal response. What in the text is leading you to respond a certain way? What in the film is making you feel this way?

Can you point to a moment in the film that is particularly successful in creating suspense? In asking these questions, you are straddling two intellectual processes: Constructing an informed argument asks you first to analyze - that is, to consider the parts of your topic and then to examine how these parts relate to each other or to the whole.

When you analyze, you break the whole into parts so that you might see the whole differently. In the process of analysis, you find things that you might say.

When you analyze, you break down a text into its parts. When you synthesize, you look for connections between ideas. Consider once again the Hitchcock film. In analyzing this film, you might come up with elements that seem initially disparate. Or you may have read various critical perspectives on the film, all of them in disagreement with one another. Now would be the time to consider whether these disparate elements or observations might be reconciled, or synthesized.

This intellectual exercise requires that you create an umbrella argument - some larger argument under which several observations and perspectives might stand. Many students writing in college have trouble figuring out what constitutes an appropriate topic.

Sometimes the professor will provide you with a prompt. She will give you a question to explore, or a problem to resolve. When you are given a prompt by your professor, be sure to read it carefully. Your professor is setting the parameters of the assignment for you.

She is telling you what sort of paper will be appropriate. She might not even give you a topic. For example, in a psychology course you might be asked to write a paper on any theory or theories of self. Your professor has given you a subject, but she has not given you a topic.

Nor has she told you what the paper should look like. Should it summarize one of the theories of self? Should it compare two or more theories?

Should it place these theories into some historical context? Should it take issue with these theories, pointing out their limitations? At this juncture, you have two options: In other words, is your professor looking for information or argument? As you think about a topic, ask yourself the following questions:. When writing an academic paper, you must not only consider what you want to say, you must also consider to whom you are saying it.

To whom are you writing, and for what purpose? When you begin to answer all of these questions, you have started to reckon with what has been called "the rhetorical stance.

When you write a paper, you take a stand on a topic. You determine whether you are for or against, passionate or cool-headed. You determine whether you are going to view this topic through a particular perspective feminist, for example , or whether you are going to make a more general response.

You also determine whether you are going to analyze your topic through the lens of a particular discipline - history, for example. Your stance on the topic depends on the many decisions you have made in the reading and thinking processes. In order to make sure that your stance on a topic is appropriately analytical, you might want to ask yourself some questions.

Why did you find some elements of the text more important than others? Does this prioritizing reflect some bias or preconception on your part? If you dismissed part of a text as boring or unimportant, why did you do so? Do you have personal issues or experiences that lead you to be impatient with certain claims?

Is there any part of your response to the text that might cause your reader to discount your paper as biased or un-critical? If so, you might want to reconsider your position on your topic. Your position on a topic does not by itself determine your rhetorical stance. You must also consider your reader. In the college classroom, the audience is usually the professor or your classmates - although occasionally your professor will instruct you to write for a more particular or more general audience.

No matter who your reader is, you will want to consider him carefully before you start to write. What do you know about your reader and his stance towards your topic? What is he likely to know about the topic? What biases is he likely to have?

Moreover, what effect do you hope to have on the reader? Is your aim to be controversial? Will the reader appreciate or resent your intention? Once you have determined who your reader is, you will want to consider how you might best reach him. In any case, when you are deciding on a rhetorical stance, choose one that allows you to be sincere. What if you are of two minds on a subject? Declare that to the reader. Make ambivalence your clear rhetorical stance.

Though some professors find it flattering to discover that all of their students share their positions on a subject, most of us are hoping that your argument will engage us by telling us something new about your topic - even if that "something new" is simply a fresh emphasis on a minor detail. Do you really want that to happen? In high school you might have been taught various strategies for structuring your papers.

Others of you might have been told that the best structure for a paper is the hour-glass model, in which you begin with a general statement, make observations that are increasingly specific, and then conclude with a statement that is once again general.

When you are writing papers in college, you will require structures that will support ideas that are more complex than the ones you considered in high school.

Your professors might offer you several models for structuring your paper. They might tell you to order your information chronologically or spatially, depending on whether you are writing a paper for a history class or a course in art history. Or they may provide you with different models for argument: No prefab model exists that will provide adequate structure for the academic argument. For more detailed advice on various ways to structure your paper, see Writing: Considering Structure and Organization.

When creating an informed argument, you will want to rely on several organizational strategies, but you will want to keep some general advice in mind. Your introduction should accomplish two things: Often writers will do the latter before they do the former. That is, they will begin by summarizing what other scholars have said about their topic, and then they will declare what they are adding to the conversation.

EssayAssist

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Website To Writing Models For Different Types Of Academic Papers website to writing models for different types of academic papers Professional thesis editing services. Academic editors with 10+ years experience. We Our free grammar checker instantly eliminates grammatical errors and enhances your doctoral thesis on business .

Privacy FAQs

Sometimes a good you will see similarities between your writing tasks and these model itsolutionkh.ml our academic writing purposes we will focus on four types of essay. 1) Tips for writing analytical essays:Citation Style Guides .

About Our Ads

pay essays written Website To Writing Models For Different Types Of Academic Papers academic custom essays acknowledgement term paper. Compare/Contrast essays; Understanding the various types of writing will enable the students in choosing the most appropriate one for his task. Many students find it difficult and choose the wrong ones for lack of understanding. Research Papers. Students find difficulty in writing research papers and they dread about it. Research papers require .

Cookie Info

They each serve a different purpose while helping students build writing and analytical skills. Research may be necessary for different types of papers and others you may be required to share personal opinions or experiences. Understanding different types of academic writing is important as each college and university has certain standards . You will be asked to write many different types of assignments during your program, In terms of academic writing, an argumentative paper strives to convince a reader of a position or stance by using statements to establish a position, and then supporting the statements with research evidence. Analytical papers, as the name suggests.